Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Things you never cared to know about Mayonnaise

I have decided to start a new Rubric. Once a week I will write a post about a random subject. Having the subject coming out of MY head, it can be about anything. I constantly have a lot of random "Why?" and "How does?" questions floating around in my head.

I will try to explain how I arrived to the subject at hand and promise to do diligent research on Wikipedia and provide you, the unfortunate reader, with either the interesting or unusual bits of info.

YOU'VE BEEN WARNED!

In addition to that I have a slight fetish for trivia.

The rubric will be called: Things you never cared to know about

Today's topic is Mayonnaise. How did I arrive to that? As I was making breakfast in the morning, I decided that I wanted to take a pita pocket and stuff it with something. The pitas are usually fairly dry, and you have to toast them. I did not have Hummus or Babaganoush (GOD! I just love saying BA-BA-GA-NOUSHHHHHHHHH!) I put a little Mayo inside to soften it up. So, there.


  • It is off course is made from egg yolk, oil, and usually vinegar.
  • According to the Oxford English Dictionary, mayonnaise made its English language debut in a cookbook of 1841.
  • Mayo was first sold in jars at Hellmann's Delicatessen in New York, in 1905.
  • It can be served in Netherlands and Belgium with your fries
  • Eastern Europeans (Russia for sure, as I still enjoy it) serve it on a hard boiled egg.
  • Chile is the world's third major per capita consumer of mayonnaise.


Trivial? Absolutely. That's what we are striving here for.

10 comments:

Nathan said...

So you're saying that Russians like a little bit of egg on their eggs?

Uh...that's gotta mean something.

Konstantin B. said...

Uhm... yeah. That is kinda strange. Maybe there's a Universal Truth to that somewhere.

Ilya said...

I am already looking forward to what next pops into your head...

Konstantin B. said...

Knowing me you never know.

Was that a pun?

Brian said...

Also of note: it's a main ingredient of Thousand Island (dare I say, Russian?) dressing. Which means Americans put it on everything from french fries to hamburgers to salads as well...

Konstantin B. said...

You could, Brian. I actually think Thousand Island and Russian are two different dressings. And as far as my taste buds can tell that's what they put on BigMac.


BTW, there is no Russian dressing, we prefer sour cream on everything :)

neurondoc said...

I was in my 30's before I found out that mayonnaise is kosher. I figured white = dairy...

neurondoc said...

I meant parve, not kosher in the comment above. It can be eaten with milk or meat for those who don't know that. I just assumed that if it was white, it had to be dairy.

Konstantin B. said...

neurondoc, Welcome!

I actually never stopped to think about the kosher-ness of Mayo.

On the other hand, I love ham and cheese sandwiches.

neurondoc said...

Well, I thought about this blog post this evening when I put a little bit of mayo on my cheeseburger... :-D